aerial view of coffees

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Experts say up to 100 milligrams of caffeine (approximately the amount in one cup of coffee) per day is generally considered safe for teens. But too much caffeine can negatively affect your sleep and anxiety levels, and even contribute to panic attacks and blood pressure problems.

Here are some easy ways to chill out on the caffeine

Roasted coffee beans

1. Go half and half

Order a half-caffeinated/half-decaf drink in the a.m., or add more water to your home brew to dilute the caffeine in your daily coffee.

2. Look for low-caf

Swap soda for a green tea kombucha, which typically contains fewer than 30 milligrams of caffeine, or switch your evening Earl Grey for a caffeine-free herbal tea.

3. Snack smarter

Swap a high-protein snack for your caffeine crutch to keep your energy up naturally.

4. Check your travel mug size

Trade in your oversized mug (anything over 8 ounces) for a single-serving to-go mug.

5. Set a caffeine curfew

Enjoy your caffeine at least six hours before bedtime to get the sweetest zzzs.

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